cubamapNathan T Webb
(Postgraduate Student, MA IREL Global Program, Webster University, Missouri, USA)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 1 October 2017

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Re-search Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

On December 17th, 2014, U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro announced a historic policy change to begin the normalization of diplomatic relations between their two countries. This landmark decision was already paying off, as U.S. engagement with Cuba increased bilateral cooperation in areas such as national security, immigration enforcement, and countering narcotic smuggling (Eaton, 2017). But today, the Cuban-American détente is at risk of collapse in the hands of the Trump Administration’s new direction. While studies show that 63% of Americans oppose the continuation of the U.S.-Cuban embargo in favor of better relations with their neighbor to the south, President Trump has taken a clear stance opposing the economic and foreign policy changes put in place by his predecessor (FIU, 2016). However, President Castro intends on returning Cuba to the international community, and if the U.S. refuses provide support - someone else will. A complete reversal of diplomatic restoration would take the U.S. back to unsuccessful Cold War-inspired policy, allowing current foreign opposition to fill the gap left behind...Read more

epassport18Kelsey Wheatley
(Postgraduate Student, MA IREL Global Program, Webster University, Missouri, USA)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 17 September 2017

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Re-search Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

The flow of people around the globe has become a heightened concern for international security analysts. While ease of travel is an advantage of a developing world, the logistics of international migration can threaten the security of the borders. To combat these risks, airports began using advanced technology to not only decrease the time travelers spend in Customs, but to simultaneously make the borders more transparent, yet stronger....Read more

triangle17Nathan T Webb
(Postgraduate Student, MA Global Program, Webster University, Missouri, USA)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 11 September 2017

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Re-search Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

Atrocities committed by the Assad Regime in war-torn Syria and the resulting migration issues in Europe have captured the attention of the international community. But approximately twelve thousand miles away – widespread violence, extortion, and corruption continue to define an equally pressing humanitarian crisis that is still unknown to many. (Cantor, 2016) The Northern Triangle of Central America, formed by the countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, is currently overrun by organized criminal gangs with a history going back to the bloody civil wars of the 1980s. (Katel, 2015) The region has the highest murder rate in the world, and the epidemic of gang violence has caused far-reaching displacement issues both internally and externally. (Kuek, 2017) As the region desperately searches for a solution, effects of the violence have reached the U.S.-Mexico border, forcing U.S. policy makers and migration experts to shift their attention from Europe to Latin America...Read more

pressphotoMichael Dagan
(Former Deputy Editor, Haaretz)

Copyright: https://www.vpnmentor.com/blog/online-privacy-journalists/ Published date on RIEAS web site: 13 August 2017

Many veteran journalists, but not only these, surely noticed that we are all of a sudden bombarded again from all-over with mentions of Watergate. Books like George Orwell’s 1984 are on display at bookstores and an air of danger to freedom of speech and freedom of the press is spreading slowly like a dark cloud over the Western Hemisphere, raising old fears. Read more

history61Prof Lars E. Bærentzen

(Prof Lars E. Bærentzen studied classic and modern Greek Philology in the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. Prof Lars E. Baerentzen taught Modern Greek and Balkan History and he published many articles on the Greek History in the 1940s. Copenhagen

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) Publication date: 1 July 2017

Note: The article reflects the opinion of the author and not necessarily the views of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS).

History is sometimes described, by those who see little hope of learning anything from it, as “just one damned thing after another”.

Others take a more optimistic view of the usefulness of history. Ludvig Holberg, a great Danish historian and dramatist (who was born in Norway) wrote in an essay published in 1748:

“I consider the study of History, second to God’s words, to be the most useful and the most important of all, when it is read in the proper spirit. I get to know countries; I get to know human beings; I get to know myself; Yes, I learn to prophesy, for one may judge from what is past about what is going to happen in the future, and therefore one may, in some way, consider every learned historian a Prophet. Moral studies can certainly be very useful; but History has a more powerful effect, when it is read with thoughtfulness and when it is of the right kind.” ..Read more

euphoto83Shaun Riordan
(Senior Visiting Fellow of the Netherlands Institute for International Relations (“Clingendael”) and a senior analyst with Wikistrat. At Clingendael, Shaun heads the project on Business Diplomacy and is a member of the Futures for Diplomacy team. He also works as an independent consultant on geopolitical risk and diplomacy for governments, Spanish companies and Anglo-American hedge funds).

Copyright: http://www.shaunriordan.com/?p=470
Publication date at RIEAS (www.rieas.gr) on 8 May 2017.

Europe has ducked another bullet. Following the poor showing of the far right in the elections in the Netherlands, Macron’s victory last night in the French presidential election means that the European Union has again avoided a meltdown moment. Not many more to go this year. It does not, however, mean that the EU is out of the woods yet, or that it has resolved any of its crises. Nor does it amount to a decisive defeat of right-wing populism in favour of a return to liberal progressive politics. Read more

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