Sofia Tzamarelou
(Postgraduate Researcher of the Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, Brunel University, (UK) and Research Associate of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS), Athens, Greece.

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) based in Athens, Greece. (Publication Date: 22 June 2014)

The tensions between intelligence and democracy can never be entirely resolved.  In new and relatively new democracies like Portugal, the relationship between the intelligence organizations of the state and democracy appears to be delicate. Areas such as the interagency cooperation, the oversight mechanisms of the state, the role of the police and the military appear to be quite subtle. Owing to cultural constraints, resistance to change may arise in (relatively) new democracies.  Past legacies hold the Portuguese intelligence community (IC) behind from democratizing itself quickly and effectively....
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Tassos Symeonides
(RIEAS Academic Advisor based in Seattle, USA)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (www.rieas.gr) based in Athens, Greece. (Publication Date: 23 March 2014)  

Crimea has voted overwhelmingly to break away from the Ukraine and join Mother Russia. Mr. Putin has declared Crimea a part of Russia. Should this be cause for a generalized crisis between Moscow and the West with undertones of Cold War-like “punitive action” against the Russians?

From the outset of this crisis the West’s clamoring for “punishing” Russia over this “breach of international law” appeared lukewarm to anyone watching closely the capitals of both the US and Europe. As usual, opponents of Russian “aggression” against the Ukraine waved various tomes of international legal text like broadswords in an obvious effort to appear holding the higher moral ground. However, to the eyes of somber observers -- but, also, many ‘average’ citizens, who pay attention to international news -- these (not so convincing) belligerent calls sounded hypocritical, to say the least.....  Read more

Dr. Juho Kotakallio

Dr. Juho Kotakallio
(Licentiate of Philosophy from the University of Helsinki, Finland.
His PhD research focuses on British intelligence and Finland 1918–1941)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS) – www.rieas.gr - based in Athens, Greece – (Date of Publication: 22 February 2014)

Intelligence organizations can be considered a necessary part of the state. They operate in symbiosis with governments and have to adapt to current political situations, budgets and other changing elements. Finnish intelligence services can be traced to the First World War, when the Finnish activists, who were working against Russia, established an intelligence bureau in Stockholm, Sweden. The Russia gendarme administration observed activist and other separatist movements. The period under Russian rule, the independence of Finland in 1917 and especially the Civil War in 1918 had impact on Finnish intelligence....Read more

Stathis Katopodis (MA)
(RIEAS Research Associate)

Copyright: Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS) - www.rieas.gr – based in Athens, Greece (Date of Publication: 25 January 2014)


National Security is one of the ingredients of safeguarding peace and prosperity within a society. However, as the Global Village grows, new threats and challenges emerge and the fight against them is nothing less than constant. With international terrorism rising, 9/11 and the bombing attacks in Madrid and London were the events that called for immediate security changes in the transatlantic world..... Read more

Aleš Debeljak
(Graduated in comparative literature from the University of Ljubljana and received his Ph.D. in Social Thought from Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, New York.)

Copyright: Ales Debeljak on line

Where does Europe end? The question of boundary has been discussed for quite some time. It is an old one indeed, going back to the destruction of the Jewish temple, the disintegration of the Greek city-states, and the collapse of the Roman Empire. This is what provides historical material for the narrative of what it means to be a European today. The idea of uniting various European lands is also an old one and has seen many different incarnations. One of them was captured well by Charlemagne's motto: Renovatio Imperii Romani or Reconstruction of the Roman Empire. After his kingdom disintegrated, numerous fiefdoms sprung up in its wake. ......  Read more

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